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Top Free Things To Do In Tasmania

by Rose Foster

Tasmania. The land of superlatives. Cleanest air. Richest history. Best scenery. We’ve compiled our own list of the top 10 activities to do in this oh-so-amazing state (we’re not being sarcastic). Buckle up. Get ready for the ride of your life. Oh, and did we mention all you are about to see is free?

1. Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG)

https://www.instagram.com/p/CDnEgsUHYyG/

As the second oldest museum in Australia, the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG) is a place literally rooted in history. It was originally started in 1843 as the country’s oldest scientific society, the Royal Society of Tasmania.

No matter your age, interest, hair color – TMAG has something for everyone. Whether you are a family looking for an educational and engaging experience, or just a tourist seeking to discover more about Tasmania’s history, the museum offers a wide range of artefacts and pieces of time for everyone to enjoy. The museum incorporates more than 2,000 square metres of public and exhibition spaces.

After a day of walking around through Australia’s rich history, grab a bite and delicious cup of coffee at the Courtyard Café. Guided tours are also available (for free) and you can drift through TMAG’S rich blend permanent collections, touring and temporary exhibitions and special displays for as long as you desire.

Find out more here:

2. Salamanca Market

https://www.instagram.com/p/CDpjWFPBrRS/

Salamanca Market is one of Australia’s largest and most vibrant outdoor markets. Located close to Hobart’s picturesque waterfront, Salamanca Market offers over 300 stalls that showcase everything from arts, crafts, jewellery, fresh food and produce, collectables, to homewares.

The marekt opens each Saturday from 8.30 am to 3 pm. With its firstopening in 1972, this beloved market has grown significantly from the small collection of traders that once made up its stalls. Now the most visit attraction in Tasmania, it is no wonder visitors describe it as the “best market in Australia”. Look out for some of the things that make Salamanca Market so special:

  1. Talk to the artisans and craftspeople who create their products especially for Salamanca Market
  2. Free tastings and samples to enjoy
  3. Tasmanian-made and designed products.

Find out more here:

3. Kunanyi/Mt Wellington

https://www.instagram.com/p/CCE0LfOByPS/

Just the drive alone to Kunanyi / Mt Wellington is something you’ll never forget.

A 20-minute drive from Hobart, cruise along this 21-km drive to the summit as you pass through temperate rainforests, sub-alpine flora and glacial rock formations, and finally end your drive at the panoramic views of Hobart, Bruny Island, South Arm and the Tasman Peninsula. This place is beloved by locals, and for good reason. 

There are open viewing platforms that protect you from the gushing winds, providing stunning views over the World Heritage Wilderness Area beyond. Make a day of it and bring a picnic too – there are barbecues, picnic facilities and bushwalking trails for all to indulge in.

If you’re an active enthusiast, mountain activities also include trail biking and abseiling.

The place is open all year round, with literally no opening or closing hours, and parking fees do not apply.

The Pinnacle shelter at the summit is open to the public during the summer months (daylight savings) from 8 am – 8 pm, and during the winter from 8 am – 4:30 pm.

Find out more here:

4. Cataract Gorge Reserve

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The Cataract Gorge Reserve on the South Esk River is a sight to take in as a unique natural formation just minutes from central Launceston. There are many activities for everyone to enjoy, from walking tracks, to a swimming pool, to the world’s longest single-span chairlift, a restaurant, cafe, a suspension bridge and panoramic lookouts with spectacular views. Did we mention there are also peacocks and native wildlife roaming about?

Locals love flocking to the southern side of the river is First Basin, where a swimming pool is located with an open area surrounded by bushland – the perfect place for a picnic and barbecue.

On the northern side, also known as the Cliff Grounds, a Victorian garden with lush greenery and exotic plants can be enjoyed. Relax on the soft grass, sit under the shade of the rotunda, and enjoy a delicious lunch from the restaurant – it all comes with a view too.

Find out more here:

5. Mt Nelson Signal Station

https://www.instagram.com/p/B8vQwKjBjUJ/

Take a break from the bustle of the city without actually having to travel too far. Located on Hobart’s fringe, the gently inclined walk to the Mount Nelson Signal Station provides an escape for those seeking it. Cross through gorgeous woodlands before arriving to the stunning views at the summit.

Starting from Lambert Park on Churchill Avenue the trail climbs the lower sections of Bicentennial Park. Take the left hand track once the Loop Track sign is met and continue via the steeper track towards the signal station. From here it is a gentle yet steady climb to the summit. The track is well constructed and easily followed. 

Once you get to the Mount Nelson Signal Station, enjoy the sweeping views of Hobart and Bruny Island. The signal station is also enriched in history – built in 1811, the signal station was used to report ship movements between Hobart and Port Arthur. Return via the same route.

If you’re up for it, take on a longer walk by exploring the Loop Track during the lower sections of the trail or continuing to Taroona via the Truganini Track.

Find out more here:

Top Free Things To Do In Tasmania

Tasmania. The land of superlatives. Cleanest air. Richest history. Best scenery. We’ve compiled our own list of the top 10 activities to do in this oh-so-amazing state (we’re not being sarcastic). Buckle up. Get ready for the ride of your life. Oh, and did we mention all you are about to see is free?

1. Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG)

Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery

Image Credits:-Tourism Tasmania & Kathryn Leahy

As the second oldest museum in Australia, the Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery (TMAG) is a place literally rooted in history. It was originally started in 1843 as the country’s oldest scientific society, the Royal Society of Tasmania.

No matter your age, interest, hair color – TMAG has something for everyone. Whether you are a family looking for an educational and engaging experience, or just a tourist seeking to discover more about Tasmania’s history, the museum offers a wide range of artefacts and pieces of time for everyone to enjoy. The museum incorporates more than 2,000 square metres of public and exhibition spaces.

After a day of walking around through Australia’s rich history, grab a bite and delicious cup of coffee at the Courtyard Café. Guided tours are also available (for free) and you can drift through TMAG’S rich blend permanent collections, touring and temporary exhibitions and special displays for as long as you desire.

Find out more here:

2. Salamanca Market

Salamanca Market

Image Credits:-City of Hobart and Alastair Bett

Salamanca Market is one of Australia’s largest and most vibrant outdoor markets. Located close to Hobart’s picturesque waterfront, Salamanca Market offers over 300 stalls that showcase everything from arts, crafts, jewellery, fresh food and produce, collectables, to homewares.

The marekt opens each Saturday from 8.30 am to 3 pm. With its firstopening in 1972, this beloved market has grown significantly from the small collection of traders that once made up its stalls. Now the most visit attraction in Tasmania, it is no wonder visitors describe it as the “best market in Australia”. Look out for some of the things that make Salamanca Market so special:

  1. Talk to the artisans and craftspeople who create their products especially for Salamanca Market

  2. Free tastings and samples to enjoy

  3. Tasmanian-made and designed products.

Find out more here:

3. Kunanyi/Mt Wellington

Summit of kunanyi/Mt Wellington

Image Credits:-Luke Tscharke

Just the drive alone to Kunanyi / Mt Wellington is something you’ll never forget.

A 20-minute drive from Hobart, cruise along this 21-km drive to the summit as you pass through temperate rainforests, sub-alpine flora and glacial rock formations, and finally end your drive at the panoramic views of Hobart, Bruny Island, South Arm and the Tasman Peninsula. This place is beloved by locals, and for good reason. 

There are open viewing platforms that protect you from the gushing winds, providing stunning views over the World Heritage Wilderness Area beyond. Make a day of it and bring a picnic too – there are barbecues, picnic facilities and bushwalking trails for all to indulge in.

If you’re an active enthusiast, mountain activities also include trail biking and abseiling.

The place is open all year round, with literally no opening or closing hours, and parking fees do not apply.

The Pinnacle shelter at the summit is open to the public during the summer months (daylight savings) from 8 am – 8 pm, and during the winter from 8 am – 4:30 pm.

Find out more here:

4. Cataract Gorge Reserve

Kings Bridge, Cataract Gorge Reserve

Image Credits:-Pete Harmsen

The Cataract Gorge Reserve on the South Esk River is a sight to take in as a unique natural formation just minutes from central Launceston. There are many activities for everyone to enjoy, from walking tracks, to a swimming pool, to the world’s longest single-span chairlift, a restaurant, cafe, a suspension bridge and panoramic lookouts with spectacular views. Did we mention there are also peacocks and native wildlife roaming about?

Locals love flocking to the southern side of the river is First Basin, where a swimming pool is located with an open area surrounded by bushland – the perfect place for a picnic and barbecue.

On the northern side, also known as the Cliff Grounds, a Victorian garden with lush greenery and exotic plants can be enjoyed. Relax on the soft grass, sit under the shade of the rotunda, and enjoy a delicious lunch from the restaurant – it all comes with a view too.

Find out more here:

5. Mt Nelson Signal Station

Mt Nelson Signal Station

Image Credits:-Tourism Tasmania & David Huting

Take a break from the bustle of the city without actually having to travel too far. Located on Hobart’s fringe, the gently inclined walk to the Mount Nelson Signal Station provides an escape for those seeking it. Cross through gorgeous woodlands before arriving to the stunning views at the summit.

Starting from Lambert Park on Churchill Avenue the trail climbs the lower sections of Bicentennial Park. Take the left hand track once the Loop Track sign is met and continue via the steeper track towards the signal station. From here it is a gentle yet steady climb to the summit. The track is well constructed and easily followed. 

Once you get to the Mount Nelson Signal Station, enjoy the sweeping views of Hobart and Bruny Island. The signal station is also enriched in history – built in 1811, the signal station was used to report ship movements between Hobart and Port Arthur. Return via the same route.

If you’re up for it, take on a longer walk by exploring the Loop Track during the lower sections of the trail or continuing to Taroona via the Truganini Track.

Find out more here:

6. Battery Point

Image Credits:-Instagram|abchobart

If you’re up for a day’s stroll through nice architecture, but don’t have the budget to do it, then Battery Point is the place for you. It is quite a charming place to discover on foot. Window shopping is a delightful way to pass the day, with plenty of antique shops and bookstores to pass through.

A historic walking tour is also available, where you can explore the stories that once filled this otherworldly town.

The Narryna Heritage Museum on Hampden Road is the perfect place to delve even deeper into Battery Point’s history. This building houses a collection of old colonial furniture and artifacts that are displayed in their natural settings. Built in 1836, it doesn’t get much more historical than this.

Find out more here:

7. Friendly Beaches

Picnicing on the beach

Image Credits:-Stuart Gibson

Friendly Beaches Walk is home to an abundance of campsites and walkways to choose from for those caravanning or camping in Australia. You can follow a dirt road that turns north along the coast for about a half-kilometre where you’ll find some campsites spaced out along the way. Although the campsites are bare in terms of amenities – there are no barbecue pits, picnic tables and running water, but there is a toilet for the whole campsite – it more than makes up for it in location. The waters here are shockingly clear, with fine white sand that feels like icing sugar beneath your feet. There are also a variety of walking paths down to different beaches that make up the Friendly Beaches. You can even walk 2 kilometres to the north along the beach to explore the entirety of what makes up Friendly Beaches.

The only payment necessary is for the entry fee for Freycinet National Park, but other than that, everything else is completely free. The campsite is on a first-come, first-serve basis.

Be spontaneous. Be bold. Come on down to Friendly Beaches.

Find out more here:

8. Bay of Fires Conservation Area

9. St Columba Waterfall

St Columba Falls

Image Credits:-Pierre Destribats

As soon as you come into the vicinity of this whopping waterfall, you will feel you’re jaw drop at its true majesty. Tons of water comes pouring down, the loud boom of it crashing to the ground below a welcome sound.

From the car park and trailhead, the distant views of the falls alone are already impressive enough. Get a little closer, and the partial views of its drop are mind-numbing. Get even closer, and your head’s about to explode. Embark on the downhill 600m track to get as close to the falls as you can, and be prepared to get in touch with nature at its finest.

Find out more here:

10. Nelson Falls

Nelson Falls

Image Credits:-Jess Bonde

Now, we’ve already spoken about waterfalls, but this one is truly a sight to behold. Witness Mother Nature let out her fury through this gushing spray of water, with ferns and mossy trees dripping with dew around you. The vibrant green encompasses you like a long-lost friend.

In addition to the waterfall itself, there is also a short walk that takes you to a temperate forest that is impossibly lush and healthy – many claim this as the healthiest ecosystem in this part of Tasmania.

Find out more here:

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