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18 Of The Best Walks In Australia That Even Non-Hikers Will Enjoy

by Rose Foster

Traversing the beauty of Australia with your 4WD is fun, but it doesn’t come close to exploring on foot. You never found the time for a 4-day walk along the magnificent rainforest? Good news: the Big Lap is the time to take on this adventure. Here are the best hikes you can choose from or, even better – do them all! A small side note: hiking is addictive!

1. Rim Walk, Northern Territory

The perfect way to experience the Kings Canyon is by walking the Rim Track. The beginning is a tad challenging since you’ll be climbing 500 steps but trust me, it’s worth it. This trail will take you through the canyon’s most picturesque parts, including the Garden of Eden and an astonishing 360-degree panorama. You can do the whole circuit in 3 to 4 hours. Skip sleeping in for a day and hit the trail at sunrise; you won’t be disappointed.

Distance: 6-kilometre loop.

Difficulty level: Grade 4 moderate to difficult.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Bʟᴏɢ ᴅᴇ ᴠɪᴀᴊᴇꜱ 🧳 (@viajandosinmapa)

 

 

 

2. Valley Of The Winds Walk, Northern Territory

Admire the spectacular Mars-like landscape at Kata Tjuta through the Valley of the Winds Walk. It’s a rocky, dusty and challenging walk that’s best to do early morning, especially in summer. You can come across plenty of wildlife and two breathtaking lookouts – Karu and Karingana. This walk is not very popular among tourists, so if you’re looking for a peaceful and quiet hike, go for this one! In the Anangu culture, the domes are deemed to hold wisdom that you must experience in person, so commercial photography is banned.

Distance: 7.4-kilometre loop.

Difficulty level: Grade 4 – moderate to difficult.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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3. Uluru Base Walk, Northern Territory

This circuit takes you up close to the base of Ayers Rock. It starts at the Mala carpark and takes around 3 to 4 hours to complete. Some parts of the walk will surprise you with lush native grasses, waterways and waterholes, while others are a typical desert. Avoid this walk in summer or go really early in the morning as it can get dangerously hot.

Distance: 10-kilometre loop.

Difficulty level: Grade 3 – Moderate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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4. Heysen Trail Loop, Northern Territory

Every avid bushwalker aspires to do at least a part of the Heysen Trail. This challenging trail is whopping 1200 kilometres long, starting at Cape Jervis and ending at Parachilna Gorge in Flinders Ranges. It takes approximately two months to complete it. There are many campsites, cottages and shelters along the track and camping is allowed in tents only. If this is not your cup of tea, try the Heysen Trail Loop through Mount Crawford Forest Reserve, it’s only 13 kilometres long.

Distance: 1200 kilometres.

Difficulty level: Grade 3 – Moderate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Fleurieu Peninsula (@officialfleurieupeninsula)

 

 

 

5. Larapinta Trail, Northern Territory

Larapinta Trail is fairly new but already a trendy walk. It’s easily accessible from Alice Springs and takes two weeks to do from end to end. The trail is divided into 12 sections, ranging from 10 to 20 kilometres that you can do in a day or two. There are free camps and excellent facilities along each segment, as well as waterholes and exciting views. The best time to hit this trail is April to October.

Distance: 223 kilometres.

Difficulty level: Grade 3 – Moderate.

Related: Every Free Camp You Need To Know About In Northern Territory

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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6. Figure 8 Pools Walk, New South Wales

The Figure 8 Pools are a unique sight on the dangerous rock shelf in Royal National Park. You can reach them through a very challenging track, only at low tide, between April and late June. It’s not for inexperienced bushwalkers; it requires suitable shoes and a good fitness level. Depending on where you decide to access the walk, it will take you from 6 to 8 kilometres. Most choose to start from Garawarra Farm carpark. Be aware, the National Park closes the gates at 8.30 pm, so make sure to go early.

Distance: 8 kilomteres.

Difficulty level: Grade 4 -Difficult.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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7. Bouddi Coastal Walk, New South Wales

Located in Bouddi National Park and stretching from Putty Beach to MacMasters Beach, this walk is full of scenic views, ocean breeze and pristine beaches. You can stop along the way for whale watching or a quick swim at Maitland Bay. As you walk the boardwalk, you’ll notice the affluence of birdlife. The Bouddi Coastal Walk is rated as one of the most beautiful central coast walks. If you prefer shorter hikes, try the sections from Putty Beach to Maitland Bay or Maitland Bay to Little Beach.

Distance:  8.5 kilomteres one-way

Difficulty level: Grade 3- Moderate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Stunning Central Coast NSW (@stunningcentralcoast)

 

 

 

8. Pulpit Rock Walking Track, New South Wales

The Pulpit walking track takes you through the best part of the Blackheath area in Blue Mountains National Park. Starting at Govetts Leap lookout, you’ll be in awe of the scenery, birdlife and wildflowers. You get to see two marvellous creeks and a 280-degree panorama of the Grose Valley. As a cherry on top, you get to witness the Horseshoe Falls.

Distance: 7 kilometres return.

Difficulty level: Grade 3 – Moderate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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9. Mount Gower Walk, New South Wales

The goal of this magnificent walk is to reach the highest point on Lord Howe Island. Mount Gower is home to the island’s rarest plants and wildlife, and you get to see them on this walk. The walk is strenuous and unmarked, and you’re obligated to book a guide. Make sure you call in early to score a spot for your preferred dates. The view from the top is worth all effort.

Distance: 14 kilometres.

Difficulty level: Grade 3 – Moderate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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10. Kosciuszko Walk, New South Wales

The Kosciuszko Walk is under snow during winter, but if you happen to be in the area in spring or summer, I highly recommended you do it. It starts at the top of the Kosciuszko Express chairlift and takes you around the Snowy River, Lake Cootapatamba and Rawson Pass. Once you climb the summit of Mount Kosciuszko, you get rewarded with a captivating 360-degree view of the Snowy Mountains and Victorian High Country.

Distance: 13 kilometres return.

Difficulty level: Grade 3 – Moderate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Rua (@rua.the.sidhe)

 

 

 

11. Great Ocean Walk, Victoria

The Great Ocean Walk is the on-foot take on the Great Ocean Road. It starts at Apollo Bay and finishes at the astounding rock formations that are the Twelve Apostles. It takes approximately eight days to do it and features plenty of tent camps along the way. The walk takes a detour from the beaches and dives into the lush forest of the Otway National Park and Port Campbell National Park.

Distance: 100 kilometres.

Difficulty level: Grade 2 – Easy to Grade 3 – Medium.

Read Next: Your Ultimate Guide To Great Ocean Road

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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12. Cape To Cape Track, Western Australia

The Cape to Cape track runs from Cape Naturaliste to Cape Leeuwin and can be done in 7 days. The terrain is primarily flat, but it includes walking through soft sand along the ocean. There are four official campgrounds along the way and many more unofficial. If 123km are a big bite for you, you can choose a segment and go for a day walk. This trail shows a vast part of the remarkable beauty of the region.

Distance: 123 kilometres.

Difficulty level: Grade 3 – Moderate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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A post shared by Cape to Cape Trail (@cape.to.cape)

 

 

 

13. Fraser Island Great Walk, Queensland

The K’gari or Fraser Island Great Walk is a 6 to 8 days adventure emphasising some of the best parts of the island. Throughout the 90 kilometres, you’ll walk through a mangrove forest, woodland and subtropical rainforest. You’ll witness vivid blue lakes and enormous dunes. You can pick a shorter walk for the family or do the entire circuit and camp under the stars for a week.

Distance: 90 kilometres.

Difficulty level: Grade 3 – Moderate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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14. Kangaroo Island Wilderness Trail, South Australia

Kangaroo Island is not all lush greenery; it’s also home to the country’s most ancient and sturdy terrain. Located in Flinders Chase National Park, this walk is a five-day bushwalking adventure. You get to see Rocky River, Admirals Arch, and the Remarkable Rocks, hike to Hanson Bay, and go back through the woods to Kelly Hill. If you have to choose one walk in the southwest, go for this one.

Distance: 73 kilometres.

Difficulty level: Grade 3 – Moderate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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15. Wineglass Bay and Hazards Beach Circuit, Tasmania

This splendid walk takes you down to the charming Wineglass Bay, continues to Hazards Beach and goes back through the coastal cliffs. The walk starts at the Freycinet National Park, and it can be pretty busy since it’s a popular tourist attraction. There are plenty of Aboriginal shell middens along Hazards Beach, but please note it is an offence to destroy or remove them.

Distance: 13.5-kilometre circuit.

Difficulty level: Grade 4 – Intermediate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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16. Dove Lake Circuit, Tasmania

Dove Lake is one of the many gems of Cradle Mountain, so don’t miss the pleasant and easy circuit around the lake. It’s a heavily trafficked walk since there’s a shuttle bus every 10 minutes taking visitors from the park to the lake’s entrance. Don’t let this discourage you from doing the walk; it’s one of Tasmania’s premium walks. Pack snacks – there are plenty of picnic spots along the trail for a deserved break.

Distance: 6.5-kilometre circuit.

Difficulty level: Grade 1 – Easy.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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17. Overland Track, Tasmania

A six-day, demanding, challenging and life-changing alpine walk through the heart of Cradle Mountain and Lake St Clair National Park. It’s recommended only for skilled bushwalkers and not for kids. The trek goes through drastic elevation variations leading to rapid weather changes. Unprepared walkers can end up fatally ill. This is one of the world’s greatest wilderness bushwalks; go for it if you think you’re fit.

Distance: 65 kilometres one way.

Difficulty level: Grade 4 – Difficult.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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18. Bay Of Fires Lodge Walk, Tasmania

The Bay of Fires Lodge Walk is a 4-day guided walk you can take from October to May. It primarily includes sand walking with a bush side and exposes you to some of the unforgettable deserted beaches of Tasmania. Even if you’ve already done your Big Lap, it’s an incredible Tasmanian escape for the holidays.

Distance: 33 kilometres.

Difficulty level: Grade 3 – Moderate.

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
 
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Read Next: 96 Things To Know About Your Big Lap

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